Shirataki Noodles

Lately, I’ve seen articles in various health magazines about Shirataki Noodles. Shirataki Noodles are traditional Japanese noodles made from Konjac flour, which comes from the roots of the yam-like Konjac plant grown in Japan and China.  A few of the wonderful things I love about Shirataki Noodles are that they have zero net carbs, no fat or cholesterol, have extremely few calories, are gluten free and they’re packed with an indigestible fiber that basically passes straight through you, giving you noodles with zero net carbs or calories.Shirataki Noodles \ ZagLeft

Lately, I’ve seen articles in various health magazines about Shirataki Noodles. Shirataki Noodles are traditional Japanese noodles made from Konjac flour, which comes from the roots of the yam-like Konjac plant grown in Japan and China.  A few of the wonderful things I love about Shirataki Noodles are that they have zero net carbs, no fat or cholesterol, have extremely few calories, are gluten free and they’re packed with an indigestible fiber that basically passes straight through you, giving you noodles with zero net carbs or calories.

But how do they taste, you ask?  Let me tell you, I tried them out on my family last night and the consensus was that they were delicious!  I made a shrimp stir fry with a little soy sauce, sriracha, bok choy and ginger (I’ll post the recipe tomorrow…I promise) and I added the Shirataki Noodles and let them cook a little with the other ingredients.  Totally delicious!  These long, thin, translucent noodles resemble pasta.  They’re tender and have little flavor but they absorb all the flavors you cook them with.

Lately, I've seen articles in various health magazines about Shirataki Noodles. Shirataki Noodles are traditional Japanese noodles made from Konjac flour, which comes from the roots of the yam-like Konjac plant grown in Japan and China. A few of the wonderful things I love about Shirataki Noodles are that they have zero net carbs, no fat or cholesterol, have extremely few calories, are gluten free and they're packed with an indigestible fiber that basically passes straight through you, giving you noodles with zero net carbs or calories.

Here are a few things I learned about Shirataki Noodles:

1.  Shirataki Noodles can be found either in “dry” form or “wet” form although I was only able to find them in wet form.  When in the wet form, they are purchased pre-packaged in water.

2.  You might find they have a slight “smell” when you open the package.  You need to rinse the noodles well under running water.  Do this using a colander and allow them to drain.

3. After you rinse and drain the Shirataki Noodles, simply throw them into a pot of broth or stir fry them with other ingredients.  They are already pre-cooked so you don’t need to cook them.

 width=

If you’re on a low-fat, low cholesterol, low-carb or even a gluten free diet, you’ll love being able to incorporate Shirataki noodles into your meal plans.  They’re a great replacement for pasta and I guarantee will satisfy any cravings for pasta you may have.

For my Houston area readers, I was able to find Shirataki Noodles in the refrigerated produce section of  the HEB grocery store in Atascocita, Texas.  Be sure to drop me a note if you’ve tried Shirataki Noodles and how you enjoyed them.  I’d love to hear!

About The Author

2 thoughts on “Shirataki Noodles”

  1. I was just in the Atascocita heb and looked everywhere! Maybe I just walked past them 100 times. Can you give me more info on where they are?

    1. Hi Angelique, I have seen the noodles in the produce section of most grocery stores. They are usually found near the tofu. If you don’t see them, ask the produce manager where they are. On several occasions, they have been out of them because the noodles are popular. Hope you’re able to find them.

Comments are closed.

Scroll to Top